H&S Handbook

 

 

 

Health and Safety Handbook

 

 

 

 

 

Document ref:

Bass SC/hsh0512D

 

 

 

Purpose of issue:

For Distribution.

 

 

Date of issue:

July 2017


Purpose and Scope

 

 

This document defines the policy and requirements for Health and Safety at Bassenthwaite Sailing Club together with arrangements and procedures to be followed in the event of an emergency at the Sailing Club.

The document and its content applies to Members, Employees and Visitors to the Sailing Club.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

History sheet

Rev

Date

Reason for revision

Revised by

A

07.05.2012

Re-written and existing documents rationalised.

P.Ballard

 

 

 

 

B

05.09.12

Amended to include the capstan code of practise.

P.Ballard

 

 

 

 

C

09.03.13

Amended to include a Defibrillator

 

P.Ballard

 

 

 

 

D

16.07.17

Fire Risk Assessment document added and other minor amendments.

D W Nicholson

 


 

Contents

 

Item

Page

Purpose and Scope...................................................................................................................... 2

History sheet.............................................................................................................................. 3

1 Introduction.......................................................................................................................... 6

2 Safety Policy and Procedure................................................................................................ 7

2.1 The Policy....................................................................................................................... 7

2.2 Revision......................................................................................................................... 7

3 Annual Report...................................................................................................................... 8

4 Safety Team........................................................................................................................ 8

5 Workplace Monitoring......................................................................................................... 8

5.1 Electric supply and appliances............................................................................................. 8

5.2 Boilers........................................................................................................................... 8

5.3 Gas Appliances................................................................................................................ 8

6 Responsibility for Safety..................................................................................................... 8

6.1 Personal equipment......................................................................................................... 9

7 Sailing boats...................................................................................................................... 10

7.1 Buoyancy..................................................................................................................... 10

7.2 Safety Equipment........................................................................................................... 10

7.3 Operations................................................................................................................... 10

7.4 Signals for Attracting Attention......................................................................................... 10

8 Complaints (Non racing).................................................................................................... 10

9 Officer of the Day (OOD) and Training Officer duties..................................................... 11

10 Safety Boats..................................................................................................................... 11

10.1 Safety Boat Manning...................................................................................................... 12

10.2 Safety Boat Equipment.................................................................................................... 12

10.3 Safety Boat Driver Responsibilities.................................................................................... 13

10.4 Safety boats attending an incident on the water.................................................................... 13

11 Tractor Code of Practise and Operating Procedures........................................................ 14

12 The Capstan Code of Practise and Operating Procedure................................................. 15

13 Emergency Plan and Procedures...................................................................................... 15

13.1 Purpose....................................................................................................................... 15

13.2 Emergency Arrangements............................................................................................... 16

13.3 Planning, exercising and de-briefing of Emergency Exercises.................................................. 16

13.4 Emergency Situations..................................................................................................... 16

13.5 Emergency Procedures................................................................................................... 16

13.6 Fire on the water........................................................................................................... 18

13.7 Other Emergencies........................................................................................................ 18

14 Serious Accidents and Incidents on the water involving persons................................... 18

14.1 Serious Accidents and Incidents off the water involving persons............................................... 19

14.2 Minor accidents involving persons..................................................................................... 20

14.3 Near miss incidents........................................................................................................ 20

15 Accidents........................................................................................................................... 21

15.1 First Aid/Emergency facilities/Defibrillator.......................................................................... 21

15.2 Accident Books.............................................................................................................. 21

15.3 Accident Procedure........................................................................................................ 21

15.4 Accident Reporting Procedure.......................................................................................... 21

 

 

 

 


1     Introduction

 

The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 places a duty on EVERY EMPLOYER to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the Health, Safety and Welfare at Work of all their employees.

It also places a duty on EVERY EMPLOYEE to support the employer without objection.

 

The scope of the Act extends to the Health and Safety of persons other than employees who may be affected by 'work' activities, for example, club members and visitors who are on club premises.

 

In the case of Bassenthwaite Sailing Club, the 'Employer' is regarded as the 'Club' and the 'Employees' will refer not only to paid employees but also to club members and visitors.

 

The employer's duties cover:-

a)    The provision and maintenance of plant and systems of work that are safe.

b)    Arrangements for ensuring safety in connection with the use, handling, storage and transport of articles and substances.

c)     The provision of information, instruction, training and supervision to ensure the Health and Safety at Work of Employees.

d)    Any place of work under the employer's control is safe.

e)    The provision and maintenance of a working environment for Employees that is safe, without risks to health, and adequate as regards facilities and arrangements for their welfare at work.

 

The term 'so far as is reasonably practicable' recognises that the 'ideal' may not be possible in all cases given the limits on the available resources and levels of potential risk. It does not, however, exonerate the employer from taking all steps possible (including making the maximum use of its existing resources and calling for more where appropriate) to meet its Health and Safety obligations.

 

The Commodore has a duty to ensure there is a written statement of the general policy for the Health and Safety at Work of employees, members and visitors and the arrangements in force for carrying out that policy (this document). This statement, and revisions of it, must be brought to the notice of all employees and members.

 

 

2     Safety Policy and Procedure

 

2.1         The Policy

 

Bassenthwaite Sailing Club ('the Club') recognises its duty to provide for the Health and Safety of all its Employees, Members and towards any person who uses its services and premises.

The objective of this Policy is to minimise injury or ill health caused to any person as a result of the Club's activities.

 

Bassenthwaite Sailing Club undertakes to provide and maintain:-

a)    A safe environment.

b)    Safe plant, equipment and operating systems.

c)     Safe arrangements for the storage, handling, transport and use of materials and articles.

d)    Sufficient information, instruction, training and supervision to enable all Employees and Members to avoid hazards and to contribute positively to their own Health and Safety as well as that of colleagues, clients, visitors and where appropriate, contractors.

 

The Club emphasizes the importance of the following in achieving this objective:-

a)    The responsibility of the Council and Chairs of Committee's for the safety of all people, premises, plant and equipment under their control.

b)    The responsibility of all Employees and Members to avoid hazards and to contribute positively to their own health and safety, and that of others.

c)     The importance of ensuring that hazards are identified and dealt with before accidents occurs.

d)    The need for an ongoing review of all systems of work to maintain the possible procedures and to reduce the possibility of accidents.

e)    The need for the reporting and investigation of potentially hazardous incidents (whether or not personal injury or ill health has resulted) as a means of anticipating and preventing the occurrence of further incidents of a more serious nature.

 

2.2         Revision

 

The Council will:-

a)    Review its principles at intervals of not more than 4 years.

b)    Make detailed alterations from time to time as may be appropriate.

c)     As far as possible provide the resources necessary to meet statutory requirements and to take all reasonably practicable measures necessary for the objective to be achieved.

d)    Monitor the achievement of the objective of the Policy across all the Club's undertakings and activities.

 

 

3     Annual Report

 

The Safety Officer will make an annual report to the Council which will include reference to Health and Safety matters.

 

4     Safety Team

 

All Council Members and Chairs of Committees are regarded as part of the Safety Team. Any person who has a concern regarding Health and Safety is to immediately bring it to the attention of the Safety Officer, the Chair of the appropriate Committee, or a member of the Council. The Council will consider Health and Safety at every meeting.

 

5     Workplace Monitoring

 

Chairs of Committees are expected to formally monitor workplaces and operating procedures on a regular basis to ensure that hazards and risks are minimised by the completion of the site specific risk assessments. Monitoring is expected to be ongoing.

 

5.1         Electric supply and appliances

 

The club electric supply will be inspected and tested in accordance with the requirements of BS7671.

 

5.2         Boilers

 

The clubs water heating boiler and warm air heating boiler will be checked annually and a record kept.

 

5.3         Gas Appliances

 

The clubs Propane gas system will be checked annually and a record kept.

 

 

 

6     Responsibility for Safety

 

Whilst the Club will do its utmost to ensure the safety of those sailing from its facilities, all Members, employees and visitors must accept that there is a degree of risk inherent in the sport of sailing and by joining the Club acknowledge that they voluntarily accept that risk.

 

Safety boat cover will normally be provided for racing and formal teaching sessions. Outside these periods safety boat cover will not be provided and Members must be aware of their own capabilities, the prevailing and forecast conditions if going afloat without safety cover. They are advised to notify someone of their intentions, including expected return times.

 

 

6.1         Personal equipment

 

Personal Floatation Devices:

 

Club members must wear buoyancy aids on boats at all times. The only exception to this is for competent swimmers on the committee boat, unless conditions dictate otherwise. (Buoyancy aids should be kept ready for use if needed on committee boats)

 

Sailors MUST wear buoyancy aids at all times when afloat.

 

The Club may provide students on training courses with buoyancy aids of the appropriate CE number.

 

The buoyancy aids will be checked for serviceability annually and a record kept of these tests. They may be immersion tested at the discretion of the Principal Training Officer.

 

Instructors are to check that buoyancy aids fit correctly and are fastened in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions before students go afloat on each occasion.

 

Buoyancy Aids must NOT be used as seats, cushions or padding. They will be stored in a manner to prevent damage or deterioration.

 

Protective Clothing:

 

Club Members must be aware of the dangers of hypothermia. Appropriate immersion clothing is recommended especially at times when the water temperature is low.

 

Instructors are to ensure students are appropriately dressed.

 

Helmets:

 

Club Members must be aware of the dangers of head injury during sailing. The club will provide suitably approved helmets for junior students if it is considered there is a high risk of head injury.

 

Helmets will be checked for serviceability annually and records kept.

 

Footwear:

 

Club members are to be aware of the danger of foot injury on boats and when launching and recovering. Suitable footwear is to be worn at all times even when on the shore.

 

Students must wear suitable footwear at all times. Instructors will check students' footwear before beginning training.

 

 

7     Sailing boats

 

7.1         Buoyancy

Club members are to ensure that their boats have sufficient buoyancy and this is maintained in satisfactory working order.

 

Club owned boats are to be visually inspected annually and undergo an immersion test or pressure test as required if they appear damaged and a record is to be kept of these tests. Maintenance will be carried out as and when identified by an instructor.

 

7.2         Safety Equipment

All club owned boats shall carry bailers and paddles, with the exception of Toppers and Optimists.

 

Instructors are to ensure that any sailing boat leaving the shore with students embarked is in a seaworthy condition and that the prescribed equipment is carried.

 

7.3         Operations

On sailing courses, instructors are to ensure that boats are rigged according to the prevailing weather conditions and the ability of the crew.

 

7.4         Signals for Attracting Attention

In emergencies:

a.    Slowly and repeatedly raising and lowering arms outstretched to each side.

b.    Waving an orange square flag.

Non-emergency:

a.    Single raised arm.

 

 

 

8     Complaints (Non racing)

Any Club Member who has a complaint about the Club, its Officers, Members or Employees conduct must set the complaint in writing and send it to the Club Secretary who will :-

a.    Record the receipt of the complaint

b.    Present the complaint to the Council

The Council will:-

a.    Decide if it is to be investigated.

b.    If not in agreement with the basis of the complaint, the Council will respond in writing to the complainant via the Club Secretary stating why the Council is not in agreement.

c.     If in agreement with the basis of the complaint the Council will send it to the Officer or Club Member either named in the complaint or considered responsible for the area under complaint. The Club Secretary will record all actions.

 

9     Officer of the Day (OOD) and Training Officer duties

 

The Officer of the Day (OOD) is responsible for all aspects of safety whilst boats are on the water. The safety boat crews will take their instructions from the Officer of the Day or the Training Officer (during training sessions) The Officer of the Day or Training Officer shall delay racing or training until there are sufficient safety boats available, they are adequately crewed, there is a person on 'watch' by the base station in the club-house or an instructor is present on shore in the case of training session.

 

The number of safety boats on the water shall reflect the strength of the wind and the experience of those sailing and when possible a safety boat shall be moored at the jetty ready for use.

 

The Officer of the Day or Training Officer should increase the number of safety boats where he feels there is a need for more cover, ensuring there are enough safety boats deployed across the sailing area taking into account the prevailing conditions, numbers of craft sailing and experience of crews to provide a quick, safe, response with priority given to gybe mark areas. If conditions are such that adequate safety cover cannot be provided by the available safety boats, racing/instruction must be abandoned and craft recalled to the shore.

 

Areas of Operation

 

The geographical areas in which activities are to remain are to be established prior to going afloat.

The normal operation area is that bounded by a line joining Scarness point to the NE corner of Castle How. I.e. in line of sight of the Club House.

This area may be extended for racing through the setting of the course. Sailing courses leaving this area may only do so as part of an organised expedition or a new operating area being established.

 

 

10 Safety Boats

 

The Club will ensure that the safety boats and equipment are checked regularly to ensure correct operation and that any defects are rectified.

Safety boats are to be inspected annually and this is to be recorded.

 

SMOKING IS NOT ALLOWED on any craft on which combustible fuel is embarked.

 

The integrity of the safety boats must never be compromised by the recovery of people from the water.

 

 

10.1 Safety Boat Manning

 

The safety boats must be crewed by two people who shall be:

A driver who is qualified in one of the following:

a)    RYA Safety Boat Certificate (plus First Aid certificate).

b)    RYA Level 2 Power Boat Certificate (plus First Aid) who is approved by the Club.

c)     Locally approved driver who has undergone sufficient training and assessed competent by the Safety Officer, the Officer of the Day, or a Powerboat Instructor.

 

Crew Member: who shall be over 14, and competent around the boat and capsized dinghies.

 

10.2      Safety Boat Equipment

 

The safety boat is to be equipped with the following:

a)    Outboard motor (serviced annually) and sufficient fuel.

b)    Paddles or oars.

c)     An anchor with sufficient chain, warp and marker.

d)    Tow line.

e)    First Aid kit (in waterproof container).

f)      An exposure bag.

g)     A knife in case of entrapment.

h)    A fire extinguisher.

i)      A two-way radio.

j)      Spare Kill Cord.

k)     Tape/ bunting for marking.

l)      Sun tan lotion.

 

All items are to be checked in safety boats before launching on any one day of use by the safety boat driver and signed for on check list. Item that have been used, damaged or lost during activities must be entered in the relevant section of the check list so that immediate replacement can be carried out. (Informing the safety officer if possible).

 

Fully operational implies that the boat is on the water, fully fuelled and equipped, engine running and with a nominated and qualified crew who are aware of their duties.

 

 

10.3      Safety Boat Driver Responsibilities

 

Safety Boat Drivers shall:

 

a)     Be aware of what equipment should be carried on the boat and to check it's presence before proceeding.

b)     Know how to operate the equipment carried.

c)     Check the amount of fuel carried is sufficient for the proposed duty.

d)     Be aware of the draft of the craft and the shallow areas of the lake. Engines shall be raised when entering shallow water. Use the anchor and float a warp rather than going aground.

e)     Be aware and comply with the speed restrictions on the lake.

f)      Know the safe carrying capacity of the boat.

g)     Be aware of the most suitable methods of recovering people from the water.

h)     Be aware of the priority to extract people from the water rather than then recovery of equipment.

i)      Wear the safety 'kill cord' attached to their leg whenever the engine is running.

j)      Ensure all crew members are adequately dressed (dry suits or wet suits whenever weather and temperature dictate) and are wearing buoyancy aids.

k)     Faults with rescue boats shall be logged in the fault book and a member of the Boats and Buoys sub - committee made aware of the fault as soon as possible.

l)       Safety Boats shall be refuelled ashore away from smokers or other naked flames, close to the boat house where spillage kits may be accessed. All fuel shall be filtered to keep out water and dirt that may cause the engine to fail at a critical time. Fuel tanks shall not be over- filled. Safety boats should be refuelled after use so that boats are available quickly if needed.

m)   Safety boat drivers using the tractor to launch the safety boats shall drive slowly and carefully so as not to endanger people or boats.

n)     Whenever safety boats have to be moved or lifted, always use sufficient people for the task. Ask people to help rather than risking injury

 

Boat speed shall be appropriate to the situation. High speed motoring shall only be used when attending an incident.

 

 

 

10.4      Safety boats attending an incident on the water

 

a)  The priority for safety boat crews is to keep watch for capsized boats, boats in difficulties or man overboard situations. Requests from the Officer of the Day or Starter to move buoys are secondary.

b)  Whilst attending a capsized boat the priority is to save lives. The safety boat crew shall check that the dinghy crew are above water and there is no risk of entrapment. In case of entrapment the safety boat crew shall either immediately right the dinghy, lift it onto the safety boat or enter the water to assist the trapped person.

c)   If there are more boats capsized than there are safety boats on the water then the priority is to take dinghy crews aboard and attend other capsizes. Marking the capsized dinghies with tape as soon as practical possible.

d)  The rescue boat driver shall keep themselves between the safety boat propeller and anyone in the water. All rescue work should be carried out over the front half of the boat.

e)  When approaching a capsized boat or person in the water always put the safety boat engine gearbox in neutral and wherever possible turn off the engine.

f)    When taking people from the water bring them in towards the front of the boat, away from the engine. Use one of your arms as a brace against the boat to avoid injuring your back. Lay the casualty down to aid blood circulation.

g)   If a casualty rescued from the water is coughing due to ingesting lake water strongly recommend that they go to hospital immediately. Lung infection can cause secondary drowning.

h)  Where possible maintain a position to windward of the sailing area, so that the safety boat motors at speed downwind, rather than slamming into waves upwind.

i)    When towing other boats alongside a safety boat, use fenders to avoid damage to either boat.

j)    When rescuing a dinghy with its mast in the mud use warps to stern and forestay, or through the centreboard case, to avoid damage to the mast.

k)   When assisting other capsized boats use the forestay to give a controlled righting, allowing the crew to get in as the boat rights itself.

 

 

11 Tractor Code of Practise and Operating Procedures

 

a)              The tractor shall only be used in conjunction with club activities

b)              The tractor shall only be driven by competent members as deemed by the Club Council

c)               The tractor shall be driven at an appropriate speed for the activity

d)              When reversing during club activities there should be someone guiding the tractor to ensure there is no one behind the tractor

e)              Tractor shall be refuelled away from smokers or other naked flames, close to the boat house where spillage kits may be accessed. All fuel shall be filtered to keep out water and dirt that may cause the engine to fail at a critical time. Fuel tanks shall not be over- filled.

f)               If in Doubt do not use the tractor, ask for help.

 

 

 

12 The Capstan Code of Practise and Operating Procedure

 

The Capstan is driven hydraulically via an electric motor. The control panel for the capstan power unit is situated in the boat house with an 'ON' push button (Green) and an 'OFF' push button (Red). An emergency stop push button (Red) is situated on the outside wall of the boathouse. The Capstan is situated at the top of the slipway and is operated by a foot pedal. A time switch is fitted to the power supply to automatically switch it off when the equipment is not in use.

a)    The Capstan is for the sole use of retrieving boats from the water.

b)    Only members authorised and trained to do so are to use the Capstan.

c)     At least two person should retrieve a boat when using the capstan.

d)    Only suitable strong ropes should be used and these must be wound twice round the Capstan drive.

e)    All bystanders should keep clear of the Capstan, the rope and the boat being retrieved.

f)     Hands should be kept away from all moving parts.

g)    If bystanders move into the capstan operating area or a boat snags or slips

the operator shall STOP the Capstan immediately by removing their foot from the foot pedal.

 

Signals to be used by the capstan operator:

a)    Operator shouts 'OK Winching' and/or thumbs up means the Capstan is about to start.

b)    Operator Shout 'STOP' and/or hand held up means the Capstan is stopping.

 

13 Emergency Plan and Procedures.

 

13.1      Purpose

This document defines the arrangements and procedures to be followed in the event of an emergency at Bassenthwaite Sailing Club.

 

The procedures include:

a)     The generation of an Emergency Plan (this document).

b)    The generation of Emergency Procedures.

c)     The exercising and testing of emergency procedures.

d)    The appointment and training of key personnel.

13.2      Emergency Arrangements

The Sailing Club Members shall appoint a Safety Officer at the Annual General Meeting of the Club. The Safety Officer shall be a member of the Sailing Club Council.

The Safety Officer (or their nominee) shall:

a)    Identify scenarios that may lead to an accident or emergency at the Club.

b)    In conjunction with the Club Training Officer, ensure that training is carried out so that Members or paid staff are familiar with the procedures.

c)     Provide and arrange for the maintenance of equipment for use in an emergency.

13.3        Planning, exercising and de-briefing of Emergency Exercises

The Sailing Club shall have in place emergency exercise schedules which will require emergency exercises to be carried out. These emergency exercises will range from simple 'desk top' exercises through to a full demonstration of the emergency arrangements.

When planning an exercise the following points should be considered:

a)     In the case of a fire, the site of the fire should be considered and the blockage of an escape route should be considered.

b)    A sequence of events should be drawn up and the expected responses to a proposed scenario identified.

c)     Risk assess the scenario before the start of the exercise to ensure the safety of all participants, observers and non participants.

d)    Ensure that sufficient numbers of persons are available for participants and observers.

e)     Identify clear objectives to be met and success criteria. These must be briefed to all participants and observers prior to the commencement of the exercise.

 

13.4      Emergency Situations

The following emergency scenarios should be considered.

a)     Fire (in the clubhouse or other buildings or on a boat).

b)    Fuel spillage or leak (in the grounds, in a building or on a boat).

c)     Gas leakage from the cylinders behind the galley.

d)    Accident, Injury or illness to personnel (on land or on the water)

 

13.5      Emergency Procedures

 

A fire risk assessment shall be carried out at least annually and/or after changes have been carried out to the building structures or layouts and a record kept.

 

Emergency Procedures in the event of Fire

 

Preservation of life is the primary consideration when a fire is or may be discovered. This should be remembered at all times and in all circumstances. Only tackle a fire using hand held extinguishers if you feel confident to do so and if you have adequate means of escape. Never put yourself in any danger.

 

Actions to be taken on discovering a fire.

 

a)     Raise the alarm by shouting 'FIRE'.

b)    Sound the alarm using the hand bell on the bar if it is safe to do so.

c)     Dial 999 and ask for the fire brigade giving your location and the type of fire involved.

d)    Only tackle a fire using hand held extinguishers if you feel confident to do so and if you have adequate means of escape. Do not take risks. If the fire begins to get out of control leave it to the Fire Service.

e)     Leave the building or area by the nearest safe exit and report to the assembly point (Area south of race office.

f)  Do not stop to collect personal belongings or re-enter a building or area.

g)     Close any doors you pass through to contain the spread of fire.

h)    Instruct people to move well away from the source of the fire, particularly if there is a risk of explosion from flammable or explosive materials (e.g. Petrol, fuel oil or gas).

i)      Carry out a role call.

j)      Do not re-enter the building or area until instructed to do so by a responsible person or the Fire Service.

Actions to be taken on hearing a fire alarm.

 

a)     Leave the building or area by the nearest safe exit. Do not stop to collect personal belongings or re-enter a building or area.

b)    Close any doors you pass through to contain the spread of fire.

c)      Do not re-enter the building or area until instructed to do so by a responsible person or the Fire Service.

 

Evacuation of occupants with disabilities

Many people with disabilities can evacuate from a building or area if given a little assistance. If you feel able to offer assistance please do so.

 

13.6      Fire on the water.

 

In the event of a boat fire on the water the safety of personnel must be considered before the safety of the boat or equipment.

 

Actions to be taken on discovering a boat fire on the water.

 

a)    Raise the alarm by radioing 'FIRE' to other boats on the water and the shore based personnel.

b)    The shore based personnel shall summon the Emergency Services if the fire gets out of hand giving the location and the type of fire.

c)     Those on the water shall only tackle a fire using hand held extinguishers if they feel confident to do so and if they have adequate means of escape. Do not take risks. If the fire begins to get out of control leave it to the Fire Service.

d)    Leave the area immediately if the fire gets out of control. Do not stop to collect personal belongings or re-board the boat.

e)    Instruct people to move well away from the source of the fire, particularly if there is a risk of explosion from flammable or explosive materials (e.g. Petrol or fuel oil )

f)     Do not attempt to re-board the boat until instructed to do so by a responsible person or the Fire Service.

 

13.7      Other Emergencies.

An emergency is defined as an event which has the potential for:

 

-      Serious and immediate danger to life.

-     Significant damage to buildings and/or assets.

 

14 Serious Accidents and Incidents on the water involving persons.

 

In the event of a serious accident or incident on the water the following procedure shall be followed:

a)     The rescue boat crew shall make the affected person comfortable and give First Aid if competent to do so. Priority should be given to the affected person without compromising the safety of others.

b)    The rescue boat crew shall inform a responsible person ashore and the Officer of the Day/Committee Boat crew of the situation and request assistance via the VHF radio system. In the event of radio failure hand signals should be given in parallel with assisting the victim. Mobile phones shall be used in the event of VHF radio failure.

c)     The rescue crew should bring the casualty ashore as safely and as quickly as possible. The safety of the victim and those assisting is paramount at all times.

d)    The land based personnel shall summon the Emergency Services where necessary and advise them of the location of the incident, the condition of the injured person, whether the injured person is conscious or not and the name of the injured person if known.

e)     The land based personnel shall arrange for assistance to recover the victim to the shore from the rescue craft and for a trained First Aider to be present when the victim is brought ashore.

f)     The land based personnel shall arrange for the site access gate to be manned to meet the Emergency Services and to escort them to the victim.

g)     A trained First Aider should accompany the victim to hospital if there is no requirement for the Emergency Services to attend the incident.

h)    The Officer of the Day or other responsible person shall arrange a de-brief immediately for all those concerned in the incident before they speak to anyone not involved.

i)      The Sailing Club Council shall prepare a brief statement for issue to outside agencies.

j)      All enquiries from the press shall be referred to the PRO or his nominee.

k)    The victim's next of kin shall be informed of the situation as soon as possible.

l)      The accident or incident shall be recorded in the accident book and a report of the incident filed in the Club's records.

14.1        Serious Accidents and Incidents off the water involving persons.

 

In the event of a serious accident or incident off the water the following procedure should be followed:

a)    The affected person should be made comfortable and given First Aid if you are competent to do so. Priority should be given to the affected person without compromising the safety of others.

b)    Summon the Emergency Services where necessary and advise them of the location of the incident, the condition of the injured person, whether the injured person is conscious or not and the name of the injured person if known.

c)     Arrange for the site access gate to be manned to meet the Emergency Services and to escort them to the victim.

d)    A trained First Aider should accompany the victim to hospital if there is no requirement for the Emergency Services to attend the incident.

e)    The victim's next of kin shall be informed of the situation as soon as possible.

f)     The accident or incident shall be recorded in the accident book and a report of the incident filed in the Club's records.

g)    The Officer of the Day or other responsible person shall arrange a de-brief immediately for all those concerned in the incident before they speak to anyone not involved.

h)    The Sailing Club Council shall prepare a brief statement for issue to outside agencies.

i)     All enquiries from the press shall be referred to the PRO or his nominee.

 

 

14.2      Minor accidents involving persons.

The following procedure should be followed in the event of a minor accident on or off the water.

a)     Make the victim comfortable and give First Aid if competent to do so.

b)    Summon a First Aider if you are not trained (a list of trained First Aiders is displayed in the clubhouse)

c)     If the victim is on the water summon assistance from the shore and/or bring the victim ashore if necessary.

d)    Record the accident in the accident book.

 

14.3      Near miss incidents

Hazards on or off the water that could significantly injure someone should be reported to the Safety Officer or a Council member. Where possible the hazard should be made safe but do not place yourself in danger.

Near miss incidents (incidents that could have injured you or someone else) should also be reported to the Safety Officer or a Council member and shall be recorded in the 'Incident and Near Miss' book (located in the bar).

 

 

15 Accidents

 

15.1      First Aid/Emergency facilities/Defibrillator

 

The Club's primary First Aid kit, Defibrillator and resuscitation kits are located in the Clubhouse outside the male changing room. There are small First Aid kits in the galley, behind the bar and in the committee room. First Aid kits are to be maintained fully equipped (at least to H&S standards). They are to be inspected at 3 monthly intervals and a record kept of these inspections. All uses of the First Aid equipment are to be recorded on the accident form.

 

An emergency telephone is located in the Clubhouse along with a list of emergency numbers. The telephone is for emergency use only and does not accept incoming calls.

 

15.2      Accident Books

An accident Book (B1510) is located by the Clubhouse First Aid Kit.

Any person who sustains an injury, whilst working or visiting the Club premises or who has any occupation related ill health must report the accident to the Council Member.

 

 

15.3      Accident Procedure

In the event of any accident staff must:

1.     Render appropriate First Aid if able to do so

or contact the OOD or a qualified First Aider.

2.     Report the accident at the earliest opportunity to a member of the council.

3.     Complete the accident reporting procedure.

 

15.4      Accident Reporting Procedure

All accidents on site and all visitor/work related accidents must be reported using the following procedure:

  1. The 'Accident book' is to be completed (and passed to the Safety Officer).
  2. A RIDDOR (Reporting of Injuries Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995) form must be completed immediately for accidents involving:

a)    Fracture of any bone excluding hands and feet.

b)    Severing of a bone (e.g. finger/toe amputated).

c)     Penetration injury to an eye.

d)    Electric shock requiring immediate medical treatment.

e)    Poisoning.

f)      Hospitalisation for more than 24 hours.

g)     Incapacity to work for more than 3 days.

h)    If the injured person is taken directly to hospital from the premises.

 

In the event of a serious accident/emergency occurring that involves members/visitors to the Club:

 

 

DO NOT:

 

  1. Make ANY statement to the media. ('No comment' or 'refer to the Commodore' must be the response).
  2. Release the names of injured participants.

 

DO:

  1. Take appropriate immediate action to safeguard the individual.
  2. Make certain ALL other participants are accounted for.
  1. At the earliest opportunity inform the OOD with the details below and explain the assistance required e.g. medical information, calling emergency services etc.

The emergency services will need to know:

a)    Exact location of the injured person (with grid reference if appropriate).

b)    Name, gender and approximate age of the injured person if known.

c)     Nature of injuries (these are best written down).

 

  1. Ensure that the injured are accompanied to hospital. Where possible this should be by an adult known to them.